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End of June seems to be the conference date in 2012. After Olga pointed to the Call for Papers to this year’s SASE conference in Boston, I am happy to announce the Call for Paper for the “Wikipedia Academy 2012: Research and Free Knowledge” taking place in Berlin June 29 to July 1, 2012. To some degree, this conference resembles the “Free Culture Research Conference” held in 2010 (see also: “Retrospect” and “Conference Documentation“), in that it tries to gather researchers of different disciplines working on free knowledge in general and Wikipedia in particular.

The Wikipedia Academy is hosted by the Alexander on Humboldt Institute for Internet and SocietyFreie Universitaet Berlin, and Wikimedia Germany. Extended abstracts can be submitted by March 31 (see Submission Process). Topics of interest are:

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This post is provided by our guest blogger Thomas Gegenhuber, who studies Business Administration at Johannes Kepler University in Linz and is a regular contributor to wikinomics.com. He participated as a live-blogger at the Free Culture Research Conference 2010 in Berlin.

The Facebook-Movie is hitting the movie theatres. The catchy ad for the movie says: You don´t get to 500 Million friends without making a few enemies“.  From an economic perspective, the social networking market has an oligopolistic structure, with facebook as a market leader. Facebook is under fierce criticism for its privacy policy. Yet, events like the  “quitting facebook day” resulted only in 34.000 drop outs. Critique might lead to some minor changes in the privacy settings, but the switching costs for facebook users to another social network are very high. To use following analogy: Moving from one social network to the next is like moving into another city. You lose a lot of your friends.

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Geert Lovink, who held the keynote at the Free Culture Conference in Berlin, believes the facebook problem is rooted in its business model. At the end of the day, facebook needs to monetize people’s social graph. He highlighted that some services address this problem. “Sepukoo and the web2.0suicidemachine allow you to remove your data; other services enable you to download your data.” Evolving alternatives like Appleseed and the more famous Diaspora are still in the early stages. Read the rest of this entry »

As the deadline (June 7, 2010) for submitting extended abstracts to the upcoming 3rd Free Culture Research Conference in Berlin (see original post) is quickly approaching, I want to share a stunning talk by Johanna Blakley on “Lesson’s from the Fashion’s Free Culture” as a Video-Reminder:

(thanks to Frithjof Stöppler for pointing to this video)

Not least because of ongoing research projects in the field of copyright regulation, nearly half of all posts that have been published in this blog so far fall into this category.  Among the issues discussed are private regulation in form of digital rights management (“DRM in the Music Industry: Revival or Retreat?“) or alternative licensing (“Alternative Licensing: Subverting or Supporting Copyright?“), copyright abolitionism (“Reflections on Abolitionsm: Copyright and Beyond“), the concept of a cultural flat-rate (“Extending Private Copying Levies: Approaching a Cultural Flat-rate?“), and, of course, piracy (“Internet Piracy: A Perfect Excuse?“).

All of these issues and many more will also be dealt with at the upcoming “3rd Free Culture Research Conference“, which will take place October 9-10, 2010 at Free University Berlin’s School of Business and Economics:

The Free Culture Research Conference presents a unique opportunity for scholars whose work contributes to the promotion, study or criticism of a Free Culture, to engage with a multidisciplinary group of academic peers and practitioners, identify the most important research opportunities and challenges, and attempt to chart the future of Free Culture. This event builds upon the successful workshop held in 2009 at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University, organized and attended by renowned scholars and research institutions from the US, Europe and Asia.

This year’s conference theme is “Free Culture between Commons and Markets: Approaching the Hybrid Economy?“. Extended abstracts of 1,000 to 1,500 words can be submitted by May 31, 2010 (see “submission process“). Sigrid Quack and myself are proud members of the organizing committee.

(leonhard)

The Book

Governance across borders: transnational fields and transversal themes. Leonhard Dobusch, Philip Mader and Sigrid Quack (eds.), 2013, epubli publishers.
October 2014
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