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Blogging about organizational strategy and even using blogs as a strategy-making device is an increasingly common practice among (not only) young firms. For instance, in a paper* co-authored with Thomas Gegenhuber, we analyze strategy blogging as an open strategy practice that increases transparency of and involvement in strategy making, while at the same time adding to the corporate impression management repertoire.

Consequentially, it comes at no surprise that non-profit organizations such as Creative Commons, which heavily rely on external communities such as different groups of license users, also engage in strategy blogging. Ryan Merkley, CEO of Creative Commons, started the series of strategy posts with general reflections on sharing, followed by suggestions for the overall mission and role of Creative Commons in his second post:

CC must recognize its various roles in a variety of diverse and active communities. We provide essential infrastructure for the Web, and are vital contributors and leaders in these global movements. The opportunity to realize the benefits of openness will come from showing how “open” is uniquely able to solve the challenges of our time. Our role is not just as providers of tools, but also as strategic partners, advocates, influencers, and supporters to quantify, evangelize, and demonstrate the benefits of open.

Only after announcing that Creative Commons had received a $10 million grant from the The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation to implement the new strategy, Merkley identified “three specific areas” that Creative Commons will focus on (emphasis in original: Read the rest of this entry »

We are proud to present our traditional end-of-year statistics below.

Top 5 blog posts 2015 (in terms of views):

  1. Open Access and the Power of Editorial Boards: Why Elsevier Plays Hardball with Deviant Linguists
  2. Copyright, Creative Commons and other Calamities in Scientific Publishing
  3. Out in June: “The Political Economy of Microfinance: Financializing Poverty”
  4. How religious leaders may influence climate change regulation: The success of the papal encyclical Laudato Sii
  5. Will the Real Anonymous Please Stand Up? German Facebook Page Free Rides on #OpISIS

Top 5 search terms guiding visitors to our blog in 2015:

  1. lawrence lessig organizations founded
  2. Andhra Pradesh microfinance crisis (also #1 in 2011, 2012 & 2014, #2 in 2013)
  3. Methodological nationalism
  4. cc
  5. g20 2009

Top 5 countries our visitors came from in 2015 (last year’s position in brackets):

  1. United States (1)
  2. India (2)
  3. Germany (3)
  4. United Kingdom (4)
  5. Australia (-)

Top series in 2015:

  1. Excerpts from “The Political Economy of Microfinance: Financializing Poverty” (9 out of 9 posts in 2015)
  2. Bordercrossing Books (2/14)
  3. The Series Series (1/10)

In total we published 29 new posts in 2015, almost as many as in 2014 (30 posts); nevertheless, this means that we failed our new year’s resolution from last year by two posts. The number of views grew compared to last year and reached a total of 36,283. Interestingly wordpress.com introduced a distinction between “visitors” and “views” in 2012; in terms of visitors, 2015 actually has been our most successful year ever with 25,355 visitors, beating the count of 24,983 visitors in 2013.

govxborders-visitorstats2009-2015

 

(leonhard)

The Book

Governance across borders: transnational fields and transversal themes. Leonhard Dobusch, Philip Mader and Sigrid Quack (eds.), 2013, epubli publishers.
January 2016
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All texts on governance across borders are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Germany License.