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We are proud to present our traditional end-of-year statistics below.

Top 5 blog posts 2015 (in terms of views):

  1. Open Access and the Power of Editorial Boards: Why Elsevier Plays Hardball with Deviant Linguists
  2. Copyright, Creative Commons and other Calamities in Scientific Publishing
  3. Out in June: “The Political Economy of Microfinance: Financializing Poverty”
  4. How religious leaders may influence climate change regulation: The success of the papal encyclical Laudato Sii
  5. Will the Real Anonymous Please Stand Up? German Facebook Page Free Rides on #OpISIS

Top 5 search terms guiding visitors to our blog in 2015:

  1. lawrence lessig organizations founded
  2. Andhra Pradesh microfinance crisis (also #1 in 2011, 2012 & 2014, #2 in 2013)
  3. Methodological nationalism
  4. cc
  5. g20 2009

Top 5 countries our visitors came from in 2015 (last year’s position in brackets):

  1. United States (1)
  2. India (2)
  3. Germany (3)
  4. United Kingdom (4)
  5. Australia (-)

Top series in 2015:

  1. Excerpts from “The Political Economy of Microfinance: Financializing Poverty” (9 out of 9 posts in 2015)
  2. Bordercrossing Books (2/14)
  3. The Series Series (1/10)

In total we published 29 new posts in 2015, almost as many as in 2014 (30 posts); nevertheless, this means that we failed our new year’s resolution from last year by two posts. The number of views grew compared to last year and reached a total of 36,283. Interestingly wordpress.com introduced a distinction between “visitors” and “views” in 2012; in terms of visitors, 2015 actually has been our most successful year ever with 25,355 visitors, beating the count of 24,983 visitors in 2013.

govxborders-visitorstats2009-2015

 

(leonhard)

After we had published the edited volume “Governance across borders: transnational fields and transversal themes“ based on a selection of blog posts in 2013 (the CC-licensed book is available as an on-demand-printed edition, as a PDF and as an Epub), we returned to blogging as usual in 2014. Please find our traditional end-of-year statistics below.

Top 5 blog posts 2014 (in terms of visitors):

  1. Measuring the “Adoption” of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRSs)*
  2. EU Commission’s Consultation Report Shows: Current Copyright is Unbalanced
  3. The State of IFRS in Africa: Is IFRS in Disarray?*
  4. The “invisible epidemic”: non-communicable diseases*
  5. In partial agreement with SKS on what caused the Indian Microfinance Crash

* also in the Top 5 of 2013

Top 5 search terms guiding visitors to our blog in 2014:

  1. Andhra Pradesh microfinance crisis (also #1 in 2011 & 2012, #2 in 2013)
  2. methodological nationalism
  3. feudal society trade map
  4. securitization (also #4 in 2013)
  5. google transnational

Top 5 countries our visitors came from in 2014 (last year’s position in brackets):

  1. United States (1)
  2. India (2)
  3. Germany (3)
  4. United Kingdom (4)
  5. Canada (5)

Top series in 2014:

  1. Algorithm Regulation (5 out of 10 posts in 2014)
  2. The Series Series (1/9)
  3. Wise Cartoons (1/6)

In total we published 30 new posts in 2014, which is only half of last year’s 61 and below our self-set goal of blogging about once a week on average. Seemingly, Phil completing his PhD (followed by an offline trecking tour) and myself becoming a father hurt our blogging statistics. Accordingly, we also received fewer comments and visitor numbers dropped, as well, but not too sharply, from over 40,000 in 2013 to about 34,000 in 2014. Our new year’s resolution is therefore to at least beat our 2014 numbers in 2015.

govxborder2014

(leonhard)

gxb-cover-klein

The year 2013 has been our fifth year of blogging and its highlight was the publication of our blogbook “Governance across borders: transnational fields and transversal themes“. By selecting and thematically grouping the articles into an edited volume, we make it easier for potential readers to grasp lines of arguments and common themes that span single blog posts. We’ve also found that many of our posts had a more lasting effect than expected, evidently supplying information and insights worth preserving in a more structured format. The book is licenced under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Germany license and available as an on-demand-printed edition, as a PDF (10.1 MB) and as an Epub (1.1 MB) file.

Of course, we also continued blogging and, as every year, we are happy to present some statistics:

Top 5 blog posts 2013 (in terms of visitors):

  1. Measuring the “Adoption” of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRSs)
  2. In partial agreement with SKS on what caused the Indian Microfinance Crash
  3. The State of IFRS in Africa: Is IFRS in Disarray?*
  4. Copyright Implications of the Gangnam Style Phenomenon
  5. The “invisible epidemic”: non-communicable diseases

* also #1 in the Top 5 of 2012

Read the rest of this entry »

GovernanceXBorders co-editor Phil Mader contributes a review of Wolfgang Streeck’s new book “Gekaufte Zeit: Die vertagte Krise des demokratischen Kapitalismus“, a book which is highly critical of transnational regimes, at least regarding the European Union’s crisis management, at TheCurrentMoment.

Today GovernanceXBorders co-editor Phil Mader contributes a guest post on microfinance and European austerity politics over at TheCurrentMoment.

 

Starting into our fifth year of blogging about governance across borders, I am pleased to continue the tradition of providing statistics on the foregoing year of blogging. For the first time we are able to present the top 5 countries our visitors came from, since our blog hosting provider wordpress.com has expanded its respective statistics features.

Top 5 blog posts 2012 (in terms of visitors):

  1. The State of IFRS in Africa: Is IFRS in Disarray?
  2. (Self-)Plagiarism in Academia and Architecture
  3. Securitization Revisited (1): Inside the shadow banking system
  4. Anonymous Attacks German Collecting Society GEMA*
  5. Transnational Ideas and Local Culture: Reading Sally Engle Merry’s Book on Human Rights and Gender Violence

* also #4 in the Top 5 of 2011

Top 5 search terms guiding visitors to our blog in 2012:

  1. Andhra Pradesh microfinance crisis (also #1 in 2011)
  2. anonymous (also #3 in 2011)
  3. wise cartoons
  4. china garment industry poverty
  5. cc

New: Top 5 countries our visitors came from in 2012:

  1. United States
  2. Germany
  3. India
  4. United Kingdom
  5. Canada

Top 5 tags attached to blog posts in 2012:

  1. transnational governance (4 out of 15 in 2012)
  2. copyright (4/20)
  3. Microfinance / Microcredit (4/42)
  4. IASB (3/6)
  5. Germany (3/10)

Top series in 2012:

  1. Algorithm Regulation (3 out of 3 posts in 2012)
  2. 10 Years of Creative Commons (3/3)
  3. Bordercrossing Books (3/9)

In total we have published 53 new posts in 2012, continuing our long-time average of about one post per week, and have received 151 comments (including our own trackbacks to previous articles). The latter means that the number of comments is about 25% lower than last year, when we had counted 208 comments and trackbacks.

(leonhard)

End of June seems to be the conference date in 2012. After Olga pointed to the Call for Papers to this year’s SASE conference in Boston, I am happy to announce the Call for Paper for the “Wikipedia Academy 2012: Research and Free Knowledge” taking place in Berlin June 29 to July 1, 2012. To some degree, this conference resembles the “Free Culture Research Conference” held in 2010 (see also: “Retrospect” and “Conference Documentation“), in that it tries to gather researchers of different disciplines working on free knowledge in general and Wikipedia in particular.

The Wikipedia Academy is hosted by the Alexander on Humboldt Institute for Internet and SocietyFreie Universitaet Berlin, and Wikimedia Germany. Extended abstracts can be submitted by March 31 (see Submission Process). Topics of interest are:

Read the rest of this entry »

2012 will be our fourth year of collaboratively blogging about governance across borders. Fortunately, more and more researchers in related fields start running blogs, as well. Recently, for example, the research group on “Cultural Sources of Newness” at the Social Science Research Center (WZB) in Berlin has started their blog, which I highly recommend. Specifically Ariane Berthoin Antal provides most interesting reflections on newness in general and newness in academia in particular – at an impressive pace.

Looking back at our own third year of blogging, I am happy to provide this year’s statistics (see stats for 2010 and 2009 respectively):

Top 5 blog posts 2011 (in terms of visitors):

  1. Boarding Berlin: The Pirate Party Triumph in the German Capital (FAQ)
  2. Transnational Studies and Governance # 3: Studies on ‘global’ markets in history*
  3. The Dark Side of Copyright’s Force: LucasArts v. YouTube v. Greenpeace v. VW [Update]
  4. Anonymous Attacks German Collecting Society GEMA
  5. The “Why?” of Andhra Pradesh – An Interview with Malcolm Harper

* also #1 in the Top 5 of 2010

Top 5 search terms guiding visitors to our blog in 2011:

  1. Andhra Pradesh microfinance crisis
  2. post-socialism (also #2 in 2010)
  3. anonymous gema
  4. Milford Bateman microfinance (also #4 in 2010)
  5. transnational institutions

Top 5 tags attached to blog posts in 2011:

  1. Microfinance / Microcredit (16 out of 38 in 2011)
  2. Google (7/15)
  3. Creative Commons (7/22)
  4. YouTube (6/9)
  5. copyright (6/16)

Top series in 2011:

  1. Bordercrossing Books (4 out of 6 posts in 2011)
  2. The Series Series (3/7)
  3. Wise Cartoons (2/4)

In total we published 56 new posts in 2011 – three more than last year but still short of the 64 posts we had in our first year of blogging in 2009. We thus did not manage to reach our self-imposed goal for 2011, which was to “beat the 2009 level of posts but keep the comment-per-article ratio at 2” (see statistics for 2010). However, we still have on average one post per week and we received 208 new comments last year. This means that we managed to double the comment-per-article ratio the second year in a row, from 2 to 4.

We also very much appreciate a growing number of guest bloggers (see guestxborders). For 2011, we are indebted to Domen Bajde, Elke Schüßler and Matthias Thiemann, who will return in 2012 to continue his series “Securitization Revisited“.

(leonhard)

"This Painting is Not Available in Your Country" A recurrent theme on this blog is how the seemingly global online world is still  – and in some fields even increasingly – divided by barriers, which are still tied to national borders. In this context, about eight months ago our article “This Post is Available in Your Country” featured a painting by the Hungarian artist Paul Mutant that ironically addressed the omnipresence of blocked video content on the web. Actually, very recently a Berlin based copyright expert told me that, for example, in Germany the majority of videos on YouTube were blocked because of (alleged) copyright infringements.

In an exhibition in the Három Hét Galéria in Budapest, Mutant now takes his idea to the extreme, as is evidenced by the pictures below (all photos provided by the artist).

Wall full of "This painting ..." paintings

Read the rest of this entry »

Not least to celebrate their first and very successful year of blogging, the crew of the German theorieblog invited fellow German research bloggers to a one-day workshop at Humboldt University Berlin on April 9, 2011. With the help of the online-tool Piratepad some of the participants including myself collaboratively crafted a short workshop report. Since the original report is available in German only, in what follows I present a shortened  version in English and ask my fellow co-authors from Berliner Gazette,  Blogmacherei, Mind at Work, Sicherheitskulturen, Theorieblog, and Verfassungsblog to forgive me any imperfect or crude translations.

How important are offline activities for blogs? The workshop organized by the team of the Theorieblog has given a clear answer to that question: in spite of all blog-euphoria, offline is indispensable. The workshop, attended by over 22 male and female bloggers,  was meant to be structured alongside three major themes:

  1. What makes a good blog post?
  2. Blogs and their readers
  3. Blogs and the wider public

As the discussions soon showed, these issues were difficult to  keep apart and debates circled around the following, overarching questions: How do (research) blogs position themselves in the context of research and the public and how and with what aims are we blogging? Read the rest of this entry »

The Book

Governance across borders: transnational fields and transversal themes. Leonhard Dobusch, Philip Mader and Sigrid Quack (eds.), 2013, epubli publishers.
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All texts on governance across borders are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Germany License.