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Credit is a useful lever for helping businesses grow. Many poor people in the developing world are self-employed farmers or petty traders, so technically they can be conceived of as businesspeople. But most farmers are actually subsistence farmers, working not for the market but for their own family’s meals, and many traders are simply traders for lack of a better alternative of stable, paid employment. They resiliently eke a meagre living out of their harsh surroundings, and truly deserve admiration by comfortable Westerners. But does that necessarily warrant them being treated as Schumpeterian entrepreneurs, willing and able to “creatively destroy” their traditional economic environments, if only they were lent the necessary finance?

We should keep in mind that people are incredibly diverse, and this must be taken into account and respected when formulating development policies. One-size-fits-all approaches have repeatedly failed in development history, and serve as a warning. Read the rest of this entry »

In the popular literature surrounding microcredit (or microfinance), a number of claims is repeatedly made which deserve a closer look. The mass media are full of heartwarming stories, anecdotes and PR-like representations of MFIs’ work, showing the apparent power of microcredit to improve the lives of the poorer inhabitants of this planet. In fact, many academic productions make similar claims without providing sufficient evidence to back them up.

In this way, the impression is being created that the development industry has found a panacea for poverty; a dangerous insinuation which can only lead to disappointment. Over my next few blog entries I will address and critically illuminate some myths – insufficiently supported claims or untested assumptions – which currently stand in the way of a balanced assessment of the true powers and drawbacks of microcredit as a development tool.

(phil)

The Book

Governance across borders: transnational fields and transversal themes. Leonhard Dobusch, Philip Mader and Sigrid Quack (eds.), 2013, epubli publishers.
February 2009
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