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Two leaders of protests against microfinance institutions in Morocco have been sentenced to one year of prison each. In addition, they are to pay fines amounting to nearly 5,000 US Dollars, a judge ruled in Ouarzazate on 11 February. The defence complained about a number of irregularities during the trial.

Amina Morad and Benacer Ismaïni, activists of the Association for Defending Victims of microcredit in Ouarzazate, were given ten days to submit appeals to the court. The two activists had earlier been found not guilty in a previous trial, but were taken to court again by INMAA, a microfinance association linked to PlaNet Finance.

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The Georg-August-University of Göttingen, Germany, invites PhD candidates and Postdoc scholars to discuss the idea of “multiple modernities” based on course literature, morning lectures by accomplished scholars, as well as participants’ papers in Göttingen from September 1 to 5, 2014.

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Over at “social enterprise” website NextBillion, Jemima Sy of the World Bank’s Water and Sanitation Program posted an interesting article debunking “Five Myths About the Business of Sanitation“. While I hardly disagree on some of the debunkings – for instance, it is true that poor people don’t see much value in minor upgrades, and instead want to go the whole nine yards when they pay for water and sanitation – the overriding conclusion that water and sanitation can and should be more of a business just ruffled my feathers. As a response, here are my Five Myths of the World Bank’s Approach to Water and Sanitation:

1. “Water and sanitation are untapped business opportunities.” Myth. Most of the privatisation efforts under Structural Adjustment went badly. Networks usually weren’t expanded, many companies didn’t even manage to make a profit. Water and sanitation work badly as businesses.

2. “Water and sanitation are private problems.” Myth. Clean water and environments are actually a public good. They have large public benefits which households cannot privately capture, and therefore are best tackled through public interventions. Read the rest of this entry »

When we launched this blog about five years ago, blogging in academia was mostly a fringe phenomenon and mainly pursued by individual researchers. Today, although some scientific associations are seemingly still struggling with the idea (see “Are Blogs Inherently Unprofessional?“), blogging about research is widespread and has increasingly become the new normal. Even the venerable Administrative Science Quarterly has recently officially featured “The ASQ Blog“, which is run by a student community of scholars who conduct interviews with authors of recent articles. (A great idea, by the way.)

Logo of the AoM Interest Group Strategizing, Activities & Practices

Logo of the AoM Interest Group Strategizing, Activities & Practices

Adding to the growing number of research related blogs, I am happy to announce that the Academy of Management Interest Group on Strategizing, Activities and Practice (SAP) has decided to also launch an official weblog at strategizingblog.com. The mission of the SAP Interest Group is to create a developmental community for academics and practitioners who wish to advance knowledge and understanding of strategy as something people do rather than something organizations have – some of my recent works on open strategizing in the cases of Creative Commons and Wikimedia fall into this category.

Currently, most of the content on the Strategizingblog are service posts such as calls for papers and articles of the bi-annual Interest Group newsletter. However, I am optimistic that we will be able to feature more original content in form of short opinion pieces in the near future. We are always open to article suggestions – just send an E-mail with your blog post to leonhard.dobusch@fu-berlin.de. For updates on new posts you can also follow on Twitter.

(leonhard)

The Book

Governance across borders: transnational fields and transversal themes. Leonhard Dobusch, Philip Mader and Sigrid Quack (eds.), 2013, epubli publishers.
February 2014
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All texts on governance across borders are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Germany License.